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Monday, July 16, 2007

OUR TREASURES: The Grand Palace of Bangkok | พระบรมมหาราชวัง







The most distinctive and important structures in the whole Kingdom of Thailand is the historical Royal Grand Palace complex in Bangkok. The gleaming radiance of its golden roofs and spires awed visitors and locals for two hundred years.

Here is where the Thai kings are crowned, revere the precious Emerald Buddha, display the distinctive Thai architecture and most of all, represents the very heart and soul of the Thai people.

The complex used to be the official residence of previous Kings of Thailand -- The last king who lived here was King Rama VIII in 1935-1946. The splendid Chitrlada Rahothan Palace (a few kilometres away) is the present residence of H.M. King Bhumibol (Rama IX) and H.M. Queen Sirikit. *I get emotional just by writing their names*

The Royal Grand Palace Complex was built around 1782 after the sacking of the former Thai capital of Ayutthaya. The Burmese has a habit of bullying us in those days and I have asked – and going to ask again“Where are they now? Huh?”


The complex is open to the public every day from 8:30am to 3:30pm, unless it is used for state functions. It is imperative that you show up properly dressed – tank tops, shorts and bikinis (yes, I have seen tourists walking about in their bikini tops and matching straw hats! The nerve!) are totally inappropriate. Entrance to the complex is 250 Baht (25 Ringgit, $ 7, Php 400) but free for the locals. All taxis know where it is and it is safe to take a taxi if you wanna come here. We are proud of our honest taxi drivers.

The Royal Grand Palace of Bangkok is undoubtedly one of Southeast Asia’s treasures. Its magnificence and grandeur symbolizes the very heart and soul of my people.


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--Pisanu (Bangkok)

8 Comments:

Mariani of Italy said...

There is nothing quite like it. I remember the first time I saw it, my jaw dropped.

Literally gleaming under the sun and hypnotically illuminated at night.

Lovely place, really.

Bjarne said...

The Emerald Buddha is a must see inside this complex. Mariani is right, hypnotical.

Carlos Javier said...

Yay! I loved the Grand Palace, it was a most impressive sight, and one of the high points of my first Bangkok visit. I have tons of photos from here. :)

LOL @ the Burmese bullies... its all good though, since the Khmers blame you for sacking Angkor too! Hahaha!

Carlos Javier said...

Yay! I loved the Grand Palace, it was a most impressive sight, and one of the high points of my first Bangkok visit. I have tons of photos from here. :)

LOL @ the Burmese bullies... its all good though, since the Khmers blame you for sacking Angkor too! Hahaha!

Pisanu for BISEAN said...

@ Carlos...it has t be the most photographed structures in the whole of Southeast Asia. Hands down.

Personally, if I maybe a little frank here, I would chose this place ot be off limits to tourists. Y'know why? There are too many of 'em coming everyday, the complex is becaoming like a one huge circus!

Erique Fat Owl said...

The grand palace is simply magnificent beyond words. When you get there, you'll feel like...now that's one thing off the list of things I wanted to do before I die.

Notice it's "things I wanted to do", not "places I wanted to go". Yes, it's THAT big of a deal.

danyhael said...

i really love indochinese architecture but i'm scared of it at the same time. it's like it's gonna stab me anytime... anywhere...

Guide to Bangkok Hotels said...

Many thanks with your good story. If i have a chance to visit in Bangkok again , i will go to Grand Palace and looking for the hotel around Kaosarn Road. I think that Kaosarn Road is good for young travellers. Around the street, there are a number of old buildings and temples, some of which have been transformed into restaurants and even tattoo parlours, although you will still find quiet family homes if you look deep enough. Aside from some interesting architecture, Banglampoo shows the mix of peoples and heritages that is the character of Bangkok. There are Muslims, Buddhists, Mons, and of course a great number of foreigners in this small area. All of this makes the area an interesting place for a glimpse of Thai life. Thais also appreciate the area for the many types of traditional kanom or Thai snacks and desserts available and the cheap clothing available in the Banglampoo Market.

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