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Wednesday, May 07, 2008

THE EMERALD BUDDHA พระแก้วมรกต






The Emerald Buddha is one topic I didn’t plan to post on this blog. The topic is “sensitive” and its history is written in different versions. A lot of people don’t know its significance and the controversy it created between a dozen kingdoms and countries throughout its 2,000 year history.

This goes to show how fragile our region actually is. Ancient animosities can still arise and if we are not prepared to open our minds and compromise, everything we worked for would crumble down in shambles.

How can I present the Emerald Buddha as objective as I can? Perhaps I can account its 2,000 year journey to its present home – Thailand… but it would be too long and I would write it a way that would serve my country. So, may be not…

Before we get accused of misleading information… the Emerald Buddha is not actually an emerald but a single block of the finest jade. It is a figure of the sitting/meditating Buddha and legend has it that it was carved in India in 46 BC. It is 2ft 2in tall and 1ft 7in across the lap.

The Emerald Buddha’s present home is Thailand -- Where it is housed in an impressive temple (Wat Phra Kaew) within the walls of the Grand Palace complex in Bangkok.

It is also interesting to note that the Emerald Buddha is adorned in pure gold and changed 3 times a year. It is dressed in 3 different sets of gold clothing corresponding to Thailand’s seasons – hot, rainy and cold seasons (March, July and November).

ONLY the King of Thailand can change the gold clothing in a very solemn ceremony. The 2 other gold clothing which are not in use at any given time are displayed on the Pavilion of Regalia nearby.

The Emerald Buddha is the palladium of modern Siam. It is the most revered and treasured possession of the Kingdom. See it on your next visit to Thailand and feel its inexplicable power over those who revere it or over those who merely stare.

The Emerald Buddha can be found within the Grand Palace in Bangkok.


The Emerald Buddha - Southeast Asia's Most Priceless Treasure.

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10 Comments:

Anonymous said...

the long awaited blog! where have ya'll been? anywho. wow. are countries still fighting for this jaded budhha? i'm sure to visit it when i visit thailand.

Carlos Javier said...

Interesting entry. I saw the Emerald Buddha during a previous visit to Bangkok but I didn't know it has had a controversial history though (now I do).

Hmm... seems its pretty well traveled too! From India, to Ceylon, and then across the sea to Cambodia, then to Thailand, then off to Laos, and finally back to Thailand!

Anonymous said...

another pride of south east asia....

well, i'm still hoping that you will feature something that is related to global warming, like its impacts to south east asia, (watch the THE INCONVINIENT TRUTH and THE SIGNOS,Philippine version)....and the
storm that hit myanmar, that is an example of this so-called Global warming....

i hope you consider my request.
thx to u and have a blessed life.

Jake Tornado said...

I've seen the Emerald Buddha and I will be lying if I say that I wasn't stunned. Truly, a masterpiece.

eyron said...

a post, yipee...

Patric said...

very beautiful postings, thank you for sharing the history behind the emerald buddha. Its also interesting to know that only the King of Thailand can change the gold clothing...truly it always fascinates me to learn about other culture. Its very very wonderful...because despite our differences, I think we are all the same...its really amazing to find unity in this very diverse world..

MischMensch said...

Nice, they have different clothes for the buddha :)

How's everyone doing, Pisanu?

Is Morgan still here? :P

Tayla said...

this is a touchy subject for some people but you can't deny how exquisite it is. i got a chance to see it during my visit to bkk and it's absolutely breath-taking.

chase / chubz said...

wow, i didn't know this. i wanna visit thailand.

Kamonshanok Palakawong said...

so...if it's made of jade, why do we call it the 'emerald buddha'? and, why do we say wat phra keow, when keow is crystal?

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